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The Staunton Media Lab Loves Flying Warthogs!

A few weeks ago, The Staunton Media Lab got its first paying customer: FLYiNG WARTHOGS FiLM. We were hired to record the voiceover for a television commerical. Here’s the end result:

Sounds great, doesn’t it? The commercial is directed and filmed by KT! Eaton, a producer, cinematographer, and fire spinner who runs FLYiNG WARTHOGS FiLM. The voice talent is Carmel Clavin of Spectacle and Mirth. The audio engineer was our own Coley Evans, audio director at The Staunton Media Lab.

The recording session was fun but challenging. Our current location generates a lot of ambient noise. We’re hoping not to have to deal with that issue as much at our new location on the campus of the Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind. Carmel Clavin must have run through the script at least 20 times. By the end, she was singing it (but those takes didn’t make it into the commercial).

Let us know what you think about our work on this TV commercial. If you have an audio or video project you’d like to get finished, let us know — talented people like Coley, Carmel and KT! are available to help with your multimedia projects today. Send your inquiries to Steve O’Keefe.

Thanks!

Adding Music to a Talking Book

 

Coley Evans, our audio engineer, shared a useful hack on a recent episode of the Staunton Media Lab.

Blind people have access to “talking books,” or audio books. Eligible people can access “talking book” machines provided by the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS). NLS offers a free library of braille and audio materials circulated to eligible borrowers in the United States, postage-free.

With just some minor adjustments, the machines can be used to store and play music files, too! The episode explains.

Audiobooks are growing in popularity for everyone, and for good reason. Still, not all books are available in this format. Many publishers do not offer audio versions of books except for bestselling authors. Independent authors can use services like Amazon’s Audiobook Creation Exchange (ACX) to create audio versions.

SML Interview – Blind Computer Programmer Adam Puckett

 

Above is an edited recording of an interview at the Staunton Media Lab with Adam Puckett, a blind computer programmer studying at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. Adam visited SML in early June to talk about his efforts at creating synthetic video and audio files. Adam creates videos by programming the pixels on the screen. He cannot “see” the videos he creates, yet he knows what they look like. Puckett is interviewed by SML director Steve O’Keefe. Audio engineer and editor is Coley Evans who, like Puckett, was born blind. A text transcript of the interview with links to sources follows. Thanks for supporting the Staunton Media Lab!

We Want Reading Glasses for the Blind!

glasses LWe Want Reading Glasses for the Blind!

An Open Letter to the Engineers at Google Glass, Google Translate, Apple Wearables, Samsung, Microsoft and any other tech firm sitting on billions of dollars of cash you made selling luxury goods you paid pennies for: We Want Reading Glasses for the Blind!

We want glasses that can focus on documents and read them into the ear. How hard is that? It’s not hard at all. You have all the tools you need to build these glasses TODAY using existing software and hardware. You have a supply chain that could ramp up that production and kick out a pair of Reading Glasses for the Blind for everyone who needs them by Christmas. And you could do this for $100/pair and still make a profit.

So where are our Reading Glasses for the Blind?

Here’s how it works. You have a camera lens embedded in the glasses frame. Check. You point that camera at the document in front of your face and take a picture. Click. You scan that picture for recognizable text in a specific language. Whiz. You perform optical character recognition on the image and turn the recognizable parts into text. Bang. You use a reading program such as VoiceOver to read the text out of the earbuds. Bam! Call it Scan-to-Speech. Almost any Android or iPhone can do all of this easily.

How Can You Help?

Get your profile made! We interview for 20 minutes and edit to 2. Audio or video. Buy a six-pack for your team! Email or phone SML at 540-324-7023 to schedule today!

A Wish Goes A Long Way

Amazon logo 8We are a vocational program in the media arts for the deaf, blind and uniquely able. Please support our programs, and check out our Wish List at Amazon.com.

Staunton Media Lab - Copyright 2017